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Title
Why do some caregivers of disabled and frail elderly quit?
First Author
Boaz, Rachel F
Date of Pub
1991 Winter
Pages
41-47
Volume
13
Issue
2
Other Authors
Muller, Charlotte F
Abstract
In this study, the authors examine the extent to which the characteristics of caregivers or recipients determine the probability that caregivers stop being caregivers. We find that caregivers' characteristics such as working outside their homes, raising children, or having their own health problems do not increase this probability. Nor does the emotional distress of caregiving increase the probability of quitting. However, caregivers are more likely to quit when recipients have six to seven disabilities in activities of daily living and need help on demand around the clock. This study also determines that assistive equipment, home modifications, and attendance at senior centers do not reduce the probability that caregivers quit.
Abstract Continued
N/A
MeSH
Activities of Daily Living : Aged : Caregivers/psychology/supply & distribution/statistics & numerical data : Child : Child Rearing : Decision Making : Disabled Persons/statistics & numerical data : Employment/statistics & numerical data : Frail Elderly/statistics & numerical data : Health Status : Home Nursing/manpower/statistics & numerical data : Human : Questionnaires : Regression Analysis : Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S. : United States
NTIS Number
PB92-167279