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Title
Causes of Medicaid expenditure growth.
First Author
Wade, Martcia
Date of Pub
1995 Spring
Pages
11-25
Volume
16
Issue
3
Other Authors
Berg, Stacy
Abstract
Expenditures for the Medicaid program grew at the alarming and unexpected average annual rate of nearly 20 percent from 1989 ($58 billion) to 1992 ($113 billion). These statistics raise a critical question: What caused spending to grow so dramatically? Using State-level data from 1984-92, this analysis examines the determinants of Medicaid expenditure growth. The results indicate that Medicaid enrollment, Federal Medicaid policy, and State policy are significantly related to Medicaid expenditure growth. The analysis also finds the prevalence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) to be significantly related to Medicaid expenditures.
Abstract Continued
N/A
MeSH
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/economics/epidemiology : Adult : Child, Preschool : Disabled Persons : Health Expenditures/statistics & numerical data/trends : Health Policy/economics : Human : Medicaid/statistics & numerical data/trends/utilization : Models, Economic : State Health Plans/economics : Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S. : United States/epidemiology
NTIS Number
PB96-139530