Press Releases


Details for: THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT: STRENGTHENING MEDICARE IN 2011



For Immediate Release: Wednesday, February 15, 2012
Contact: CMS Media Relations
202-690-6145


THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT: STRENGTHENING MEDICARE IN 2011

In 2011, millions of seniors and people with disabilities enjoyed lower costs and improved benefits thanks to the Affordable Care Act.  This report details how over 25.7 million Americans in traditional Medicare received free preventive services in 2011.  In Medicare Advantage, last year 9.3 million Americans – 97 percent of those in individual Medicare Advantage plans – were enrolled in a plan that offers free preventive services.

Assuming that Medicare Advantage beneficiaries utilized preventive services at the same rate as beneficiaries in traditional Medicare, an estimated 32.5 million beneficiaries benefited from Medicare’s coverage of prevention with no cost sharing.  Last year 3.6 million Americans also saved $2.1 billion on their prescription drugs as a result of provisions in the Affordable Care Act.

In addition, seniors are benefitting as the Affordable Care Act is fully implemented:

  • By 2020, the “donut hole” coverage gap will be closed;
  • Premiums have remained low for seniors and people with disabilities in traditional Medicare;
  • Medicare will have stronger tools to fight fraud;
  • Those enrolled in Medicare Advantage and Medicare Part D plans continue to enjoy low premiums and broad choice in coverage;
  • Quality improvements will help prevent medical errors and promote coordination of care across Medicare and the health care system.

OVER 25 MILLION IN MEDICARE – REPRESENTING 73 PERCENT OF THOSE ELIGIBLE – USED ONE OR MORE FREE PREVENTIVE SERVICE IN 2011

One of the major goals of the Affordable Care Act is to help people stay healthy by giving them the tools they need to take charge of their own health, fostering a culture of prevention that encourages patients to partner with their physicians and other caregivers.

Beginning January 1, 2011, the Affordable Care Act eliminated Part B coinsurance and deductibles for recommended preventive services, including many cancer screenings and key immunizations. The law also added an important new service — an Annual Wellness Visit with a health professional — at no cost to beneficiaries.

According to preliminary numbers, at least 25,720,996 million Americans took advantage of at least one free preventive benefit in Medicare in 2011, including the new Annual Wellness Visit.  This represents 73.3% of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries, including 2,404,792 African-American beneficiaries, 537,110 Hispanic beneficiaries, 104,393 American Indian beneficiaries, and 508,398 Asian-American beneficiaries.

In addition, Americans in Medicare Advantage plans had access to free preventive services, as many private insurance plans matched Medicare in offering many preventive services without charge. Last year 9.3 million Americans – 97 percent of those in individual Medicare Advantage plans – were enrolled in a plan that waives cost-sharing for  free preventive services.*  In 2012, all Medicare Advantage plans are required to cover the same free preventive services.

The free preventive services include the following, along with their utilization rates in 2011:

Previously subject to both the Part B deductible and coinsurance/copayment:

•          Bone Mass Measurement:                                                2,750,966

•          Hepatitis B (HBV) Vaccine:                                                156,077

•          Tobacco Cessation Counseling:                                             48,806

•          Medical Nutrition Therapy:                                                  185,212

 

Previously exempt from the Part B deductible, but subject to coinsurance/copayment:

•          Pap Tests (that require physician interpretation):                 1,204,446

•          Pelvic Examination:                                                            1,413,706

•          Screening Mammography:                                                  6,045,754

•          Most screening procedures for colorectal cancer:                1,167,358

•          Ultrasound Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm:            59,573

 

Previously exempt from both the Part B deductible and coinsurance/copayment:

•          Pap Tests (that do not require physician interpretation):       1,508,962

•          Fecal Occult Blood Test for colorectal cancer screening:     1,089,026

•          Prostate-specific Antigen (PSA) Test:                                 2,627,254

•          Diabetes Screening Test:                                                     2,383,445

•          Cardiovascular Disease Screening Blood Tests:                 20,060,998

•          Seasonal Influenza Virus Vaccine:                                      14,551,349

•          Pneumococcal Vaccine:                                                       1,838,442

•          Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Screening:                     30,289

 

New services added during 2011

•          Annual Wellness Visit

•          Alcohol Misuse Screening and Behavioral Counseling in Primary Care

•          Obesity Screening and Intensive Behavioral Therapy in Primary Care

•          Annual Depression Screening in Primary Care

•          Intensive Behavioral Therapy in Primary Care for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction

•          STI Screening and Counseling in Primary Care

STATE-BY-STATE – UTILIZATION OF FREE PREVENTIVE SERVICES

 

All Free Services by Part B Enrollees

Medicare Part B Enrollees - Total

%

Annual Wellness Visit

Individual MA enrollees with free preventive care

Total individual MA enrollees

%

Nation

25,720,996

35,106,598

73.3%

2,278,216

9,326,762

9,573,059

97.4%

Alabama

501,123

688,391

72.8%

17,183

174,856

174,877

100.0%

Alaska

38,589

66,816

57.8%

2,784

130

134

97.0%

Arizona

421,348

603,067

69.9%

57,011

307,052

311,736

98.5%

Arkansas

325,637

466,243

69.8%

15,468

79,096

79,105

100.0%

California

2,080,682

3,010,372

69.1%

165,174

1,307,853

1,337,665

97.8%

Colorado

281,803

421,313

66.9%

37,375

149,165

149,180

100.0%

Connecticut

343,882

446,825

77.0%

64,967

101,750

102,656

99.1%

Delaware

114,396

148,194

77.2%

8,809

4,582

4,591

99.8%

District of Columbia

43,886

65,231

67.3%

3,114

2,423

2,428

99.8%

Florida

1,824,665

2,408,698

75.8%

197,989

999,452

1,054,740

94.8%

Georgia

722,824

1,000,032

72.3%

66,290

177,056

192,912

91.8%

Hawaii

77,117

111,976

68.9%

1,850

58,519

58,524

100.0%

Idaho

110,179

169,202

65.1%

10,982

65,523

65,535

100.0%

Illinois

1,244,971

1,673,760

74.4%

89,630

145,325

145,353

100.0%

Indiana

619,735

847,752

73.1%

51,282

159,027

159,744

99.6%

Iowa

348,370

456,206

76.4%

24,272

52,860

52,864

100.0%

Kansas

281,630

388,902

72.4%

19,237

43,445

43,451

100.0%

Kentucky

470,483

647,347

72.7%

25,865

93,841

93,853

100.0%

Louisiana

375,977

530,611

70.9%

13,643

157,151

158,004

99.5%

Maine

167,461

231,303

72.4%

29,265

27,449

27,455

100.0%

Maryland

528,204

705,635

74.9%

42,440

34,225

35,677

95.9%

Massachusetts

656,146

845,861

77.6%

128,634

159,320

159,341

100.0%

Michigan

983,279

1,309,925

75.1%

127,887

186,640

213,392

87.5%

Minnesota

306,865

434,556

70.6%

22,333

164,820

164,846

100.0%

Mississippi

325,317

465,486

69.9%

14,560

46,100

47,984

96.1%

Missouri

582,585

796,068

73.2%

34,872

200,712

200,727

100.0%

Montana

98,711

148,590

66.4%

9,888

24,565

24,575

100.0%

Nebraska

176,824

247,901

71.3%

10,667

29,245

29,248

100.0%

Nevada

161,039

249,340

64.6%

10,723

107,279

107,815

99.5%

New Hampshire

155,032

208,562

74.3%

20,542

11,741

11,752

99.9%

New Jersey

876,150

1,148,208

76.3%

88,118

144,062

144,136

99.9%

New Mexico

149,263

233,129

64.0%

11,455

69,761

69,767

100.0%

New York

1,490,742

2,013,557

74.0%

150,720

702,929

759,329

92.6%

North Carolina

980,876

1,280,705

76.6%

104,139

236,513

245,898

96.2%

North Dakota

71,444

99,120

72.1%

5,044

5,241

5,243

100.0%

Ohio

922,374

1,269,286

72.7%

60,050

385,326

385,372

100.0%

Oklahoma

361,692

521,014

69.4%

13,544

84,066

84,073

100.0%

Oregon

248,422

370,499

67.1%

19,824

207,377

214,266

96.8%

Pennsylvania

1,014,420

1,378,840

73.6%

58,799

670,870

690,171

97.2%

Rhode Island

85,385

111,999

76.2%

19,036

56,184

56,190

100.0%

South Carolina

509,306

681,906

74.7%

37,222

124,882

124,944

100.0%

South Dakota

89,068

125,244

71.1%

5,264

10,281

10,282

100.0%

Tennessee

603,012

820,253

73.5%

49,865

264,119

264,149

100.0%

Texas

1,790,859

2,463,200

72.7%

157,246

574,697

580,242

99.0%

Utah

124,809

183,641

68.0%

10,673

89,364

89,382

100.0%

Vermont

77,874

107,731

72.3%

10,078

5,244

5,246

100.0%

Virginia

736,957

981,839

75.1%

53,197

134,169

139,287

96.3%

Washington

499,166

728,222

68.5%

48,627

224,589

224,629

100.0%

West Virginia

212,905

302,640

70.3%

7,554

33,592

33,601

100.0%

Wisconsin

477,789

645,345

74.0%

39,062

229,363

233,755

98.1%

Wyoming

46,907

78,141

60.0%

2,943

2,931

2,933

99.9%

 

*Note – these figures are only for individual MA plans and do not include employer-based MA plans.

3.6 MILLION IN MEDICARE SAVED MORE THAN $2.1 BILLION ON PRESCRIPTION DRUGS IN THE DONUT HOLE IN 2011

The Affordable Care Act includes benefits to make your Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D) more affordable.   When the Part D program was created, there was a gap in coverage, where most beneficiaries would pay 100 percent of their drug costs while still paying their premiums.  This gap – which occurs after the plan pays a certain amount, but before beneficiaries hit catastrophic coverage and they only are responsible for a small percent of their drug costs, usually around 5 percent – is called the “donut hole.”

The Affordable Care Act is closing the donut hole over time, and has already saved seniors and people with disabilities over $3 billion on prescription drugs since the law was enacted in March 2010.  In 2011, seniors and people with disabilities who reached the coverage gap in Medicare Part D coverage automatically received a 50% discount on covered brand-name drugs and a 7% discount on generic drugs.  These discounts will continue to grow over time until the donut hole is closed. To receive the discount, no special action is required. Seniors simply purchase drugs at the pharmacy and receive the discount automatically.

In 2011, about 3.6 million Medicare beneficiaries benefited from discounts on prescription drugs in the donut hole coverage gap.  These seniors and people with disabilities received more than $2.1 billion in discounts, or an average of $604 per beneficiary.

Women who hit the donut hole benefitted from this provision in the Affordable Care Act, with 2.05 million women saving a total of $1.2 billion on their prescription drugs.  Beneficiaries also received a 7 percent savings on generic drugs in the donut hole in 2011, with 2,814,646 beneficiaries receiving $32.1 million in savings on generic drugs.

The HHS Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation released a brief today projecting that the average Medicare beneficiary will save approximately $4,200 from 2011 to 2021, while those with high prescription drug spending will save much more – nearly $16,000 over the same period.  These findings, along with the data from 2011, show that while all individuals will benefit from lower costs thanks to the Affordable Care Act, those with high drug costs are seeing considerable savings which will continue to grow.

In 2011, seniors and people with disabilities saved money on a wide variety of drugs, including:

  • Blood sugar lowering drugs- $300,259,057
  • Triglyceride and Cholesterol lowering drugs- $263,182,711
  • Asthma and Other Lung Related (non-cancer) Disease drugs- $228,522,896
  • Drugs used to lower Blood pressure - $120,214,657
  • Psychiatric drugs- $101,511,953
  • Drugs Used to Prevent Platelets from Clotting Blood - $195,230,876
  • Anti-dementia drugs- $108,868,359
  • Anti-depression drugs- $72,917,239
  • Cancer drugs- $71,854,747
  • Drugs Used to Treat Ulcers- $70,007,664
  • All Other Drug Therapeutic Uses- $626,822,848

Most of these drugs are for chronic conditions, suggesting that the discounts are helping people pay for expensive medications that they must take on an ongoing basis.  Making such prescriptions more affordable also helps prevent more costly care that often results from conditions like high blood pressure and cholesterol.  About 13 percent of the savings were for drugs to help manage mental illness which also helps keep beneficiaries active and living at home.

Last year’s progress builds on the savings in 2010, when nearly 4 million beneficiaries who hit the donut hole received a $250 rebate under the Affordable Care Act to help them afford prescription drugs in the coverage gap.

Seniors and people with disabilities will receive additional savings on covered brand-name and generic drugs while in the coverage gap until the gap is closed in 2020. See the schedule below for information on what Part D beneficiaries will pay for drugs while in the coverage gap:

  • 2012: Medicare Part D beneficiaries will save 50% on brand-name drugs and 14% on generic drugs
  • 2013: Medicare Part D beneficiaries will save 52.5% on brand-names and 21% on generics
  • 2014: Medicare Part D beneficiaries will save 52.5% on brand-names and 28% on generics
  • 2015: Medicare Part D beneficiaries will save 55% on brand-names and 35% on generics
  • 2016: Medicare Part D beneficiaries will save 55% on brand-names and 42% on generics
  • 2017: Medicare Part D beneficiaries will save 60% on brand-names and 49% on generics
  • 2018: Medicare Part D beneficiaries will save 65% on brand-names and 56% on generics
  • 2019: Medicare Part D beneficiaries will save 70% on brand-names and 63% on generics
  • 2020: Medicare Part D beneficiaries will save 75% on brand-names and 75% on generics

STATE-BY-STATE – DISCOUNTS IN THE DONUT HOLE

 

Number Who Received Discounts

Total Savings

Average Savings Per Beneficiary

Women Who Received Discounts

Total Savings for Women

Average Savings For Women

Nation*

3,576,640

$2,159,393,008

$604

2,049,480

$1,228,349,965

$599

Alabama

50,119

$29,827,543

$595

28,463

$16,806,367

$590

Alaska

2,277

$1,598,748

$702

1,284

$885,359

$690

Arizona

65,729

$36,977,657

$563

37,199

$20,692,193

$556

Arkansas

34,083

$19,967,083

$586

19,766

$11,511,600

$582

California

319,429

$171,983,735

$538

176,317

$92,628,030

$525

Colorado

39,476

$22,846,993

$579

22,102

$12,743,777

$577

Connecticut

37,701

$24,661,193

$654

21,746

$14,185,071

$652

Delaware

12,356

$9,358,894

$757

6,948

$5,101,129

$734

District of Columbia

2,551

$1,583,039

$621

1,388

$796,285

$574

Florida

238,362

$141,948,339

$596

132,889

$78,367,670

$590

Georgia

102,366

$58,632,728

$573

58,637

$33,460,293

$571

Hawaii

21,278

$6,891,558

$324

11,980

$3,988,123

$333

Idaho

14,963

$8,665,605

$579

8,616

$4,918,878

$571

Illinois

144,226

$96,216,548

$667

86,352

$56,680,828

$656

Indiana

89,096

$57,735,983

$648

52,368

$33,353,558

$637

Iowa

42,015

$25,876,475

$616

25,051

$15,219,683

$608

Kansas

38,692

$23,437,243

$606

23,380

$14,069,218

$602

Kentucky

74,913

$40,147,823

$536

42,940

$22,279,692

$519

Louisiana

52,932

$30,247,275

$571

29,174

$16,596,023

$569

Maine

11,892

$6,306,962

$530

6,566

$3,471,146

$529

Maryland

52,243

$30,770,301

$589

30,618

$17,738,165

$579

Massachusetts

62,831

$36,897,940

$587

36,289

$21,432,454

$591

Michigan

84,168

$48,999,065

$582

47,716

$27,728,366

$581

Minnesota

57,610

$33,963,871

$590

33,424

$19,694,476

$589

Mississippi

33,510

$20,190,640

$603

19,523

$11,616,523

$595

Missouri

78,585

$46,763,813

$595

45,949

$27,465,119

$598

Montana

10,415

$6,409,940

$615

6,048

$3,654,010

$604

Nebraska

24,070

$15,175,406

$630

14,400

$9,020,777

$626

Nevada

22,193

$12,274,764

$553

11,758

$6,476,529

$551

New Hampshire

13,187

$8,187,145

$621

7,732

$4,846,318

$627

New Jersey

125,968

$95,200,406

$756

74,860

$56,502,356

$755

New Mexico

18,755

$9,199,904

$491

10,522

$5,095,403

$484

New York

230,115

$159,916,221

$695

132,646

$92,847,473

$700

North Carolina

108,198

$65,161,683

$602

59,894

$35,643,119

$595

North Dakota

9,983

$5,915,547

$593

5,881

$3,402,023

$578

Ohio

185,014

$94,798,047

$512

106,303

$53,539,473

$504

Oklahoma

54,173

$28,461,930

$525

31,467

$16,153,788

$513

Oregon

44,877

$23,505,132

$524

26,085

$13,379,579

$513

Pennsylvania

235,820

$156,108,903

$662

141,093

$94,913,023

$673

Puerto Rico

85,981

$47,170,502

$549

51,445

$28,011,325

$544

Rhode Island

14,822

$8,217,475

$554

8,673

$4,765,790

$549

South Carolina

53,081

$32,646,527

$615

30,230

$18,555,300

$614

South Dakota

10,923

$6,732,077

$616

6,527

$3,933,361

$603

Tennessee

82,841

$48,901,634

$590

46,809

$27,573,712

$589

Texas

210,763

$134,754,191

$639

118,197

$74,159,582

$627

Utah

21,016

$12,371,267

$589

12,074

$6,984,966

$579

Vermont

6,795

$4,849,624

$714

3,750

$2,650,927

$707

Virginia

81,535

$48,949,685

$600

46,298

$27,344,943

$591

Washington

60,209

$35,999,334

$598

33,619

$19,815,210

$589

West Virginia

36,036

$23,543,921

$653

19,913

$12,291,103

$617

Wisconsin

59,345

$37,919,307

$639

32,670

$20,943,773

$641

Wyoming

5,540

$3,550,375

$641

3,262

$2,019,085

$619

 

MEDICARE BENEFICIARIES ENJOYING LOWER PREMIUMS

Many seniors and people with disabilities continue to see low premiums in Medicare.  The standard Medicare Part B premium will be $99.90 a month in 2012, $6.70 lower than the amount projected earlier this year.  Part B enrollees who paid the higher standard Part B premium in 2011 of $115.40 will see their premiums decrease by $15.50.

The majority of people with Medicare have paid $96.40 per month for Part B since 2008, due to a law that prevents their Social Security check from decreasing as a result of an increase in the Part B premium.  In 2012, these people will pay the standard Part B premium of $99.90, which amounts to a monthly increase of $3.50, or 3.6%.   The Social Security cost-of-living adjustment for 2012 is also 3.6 %, meaning that Medicare Part B premiums for these beneficiaries will be the same percent of their Social Security check in 2012 as they were in the last three years, and Social Security benefits net of Medicare premiums will be increasing again.

In 2012, the Part B deductible fell by $22 to $144 – the first time in Medicare’s history when the deductible was lower.  This happened because Medicare cost growth is low.

HHS announced that average Medicare Advantage premiums for 2012 have decreased by 7% and enrollment has risen by 10%.  Almost all (99.7%) of seniors and people with disabilities continue to enjoy access to a Medicare Advantage plan, and benefits remain consistent with those offered in 2011.

CMS used authority provided by the Affordable Care Act to protect people with Medicare Advantage from significant increases in costs or cuts in benefits in 2012, contributing to average premium declines for the second year in a row: 2012 premiums are 16% below 2010 premiums.

Average prescription drug plan premiums will remain virtually unchanged in 2012.  Based on plans’ projections, the cost of the average Medicare prescription drug plan premium in 2012 will be about $30 – the average premium in 2011 was $30.76.  New tools from health reform and slow growth in Medicare have kept the cost of prescription drug coverage from growing. 

IMPLEMENTING PROVISIONS TO IMPROVE HEALTH CARE QUALITY

IN MEDICARE

Medicare is continually improving. The Affordable Care Act provides new incentives and programs that will reward doctors and hospitals that coordinate care better and will improve the program for all seniors and people with disabilities.  Some of these programs include:

Partnership for Patients:   A public-private partnership that aims to improve the quality, safety, and affordability of health care for all Americans by keeping patients from getting injured or sicker, and helping them heal without complication.  The Partnership for Patients brings together leaders of major hospitals, employers, physicians, nurses, and patient advocates along with state and federal governments in a shared effort to make hospital care safer, more reliable, and less costly.  More than 7,100 partners, including over 3,200 hospitals as well as physicians and nurses groups, consumer groups, and employers, have pledged their commitment to the Partnership for Patients.

Achieving these goals could save Medicare and patients as much as $50 billion and save tens of thousands of lives.  Hospitals and doctors are now beginning to communicate through the Partnership for Patients on best practices to improve patient safety.

Accountable Care Organizations: People with Medicare are starting to benefit from a new program designed to encourage primary care doctors, specialists, hospitals, and other care providers to coordinate their care.  These groups of providers – called Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) – are in the process of forming.  If a Medicare beneficiary’s doctor is enrolled in an ACO, he or she will still have the option to see all participating doctors in Medicare.  The first ACOs have started at the beginning of 2012, and doctors and hospitals have started to sign up for demonstrations that emphasize coordination centered on primary care, and bundling payments to providers for episodes when patients are treated by several different providers.

Value-Based Purchasing: The Affordable Care Act puts into place Medicare payment incentives for doctors, hospitals, health plans, and other providers who deliver better quality care – rewarding how well they do for patients, instead of how much they do for patients.

Seniors in Medicare Advantage plans will also see better quality thanks to incentives in the Affordable Care Act.  Medicare Advantage plans that achieve “three-star” or better quality ratings will receive bonus payments, giving an incentive for all plans to improve care for patients.  The best Medicare Advantage plans that achieve a five-star rating will be able to market to and enroll seniors all year round, not just in the open enrollment period – giving seniors the ability to move to the best plans any time. 

PROTECTING SENIORS AND TAXPAYERS FROM MEDICARE FRAUD

Seniors and people with disabilities in Medicare are benefitting from a more secure program.  The Affordable Care Act contains new steps and enhanced authority to crack down on criminals who are looking to defraud Medicare.  These provisions, many of which have already gone into effect, will protect seniors from fraudsters and protect taxpayers.

The Affordable Care Act takes several critical steps to help fight fraud, including:

  • Increasing the federal sentencing guidelines for health care fraud offenses by 20-50% for crimes that involve more than $1 million in losses. The law establishes penalties for obstructing a fraud investigation and makes it easier for the government to recapture any funds acquired through fraudulent practices;
  • Using the sophisticated predictive analytics technology employed by the credit card and telecommunications industries to identify patterns of fraud and prioritize targets for fraud investigators and prosecutors;
  • Stopping bad actors from entering the system, by making providers and suppliers who have historically posed a higher risk of fraud or abuse undergo a higher level of scrutiny than others before enrolling or re-enrolling in the Medicare, Medicaid, or CHIP;
  • Fostering better coordination among states, CMS, and law enforcement partners at the Office of the Inspector General and Department of Justice.  New rules authorize CMS to suspend Medicare payments to providers or suppliers during the investigation of a credible allegation of fraud;
  • Requiring certain claims data from Medicare, Medicaid and CHIP, the Veterans Administration, the Department of Defense, the Social Security Disability Insurance program, and the Indian Health Service to be centralized, making it easier for agency and law enforcement officials to identify criminals and prevent fraud on a system-wide basis;
  • Providing an additional $350 million over 10 years to ramp up anti-fraud efforts, including increasing scrutiny of claims before they’ve been paid, investments in sophisticated data analytics, and more “feet on the street” law enforcement agents and others to fight fraud in the health care system.

In concert with the new Affordable Care Act authorities, the Obama Administration has expanded funding for Senior Medicare Patrols – groups of senior citizen volunteers to educate and empower their peers to identify, prevent and report health care fraud.  The Obama Administration has also increased government collaboration through the Health Care Fraud Prevention and Enforcement Action Team (HEAT).  This is a joint cabinet-wide effort between HHS and DOJ to fight health care fraud by increasing coordination, intelligence sharing, and training among investigators, agents, prosecutors, analysts, and policymakers.  A key component of HEAT is the Medicare Strike Force teams which are comprised of interagency teams of analysts, investigators, and prosecutors who can target emerging or migrating fraud schemes, including fraud by criminals masquerading as health care providers or suppliers. 

In 2011, HEAT coordinated the largest-ever federal health care fraud takedown, measured by number of defendants and measured by fraudulent billings.  In one action, Strike Force teams charged 115 defendants in nine cities, including doctors, nurses, health care company owners and executives, for their alleged participation in Medicare fraud schemes involving more than $240 million in false billing.  In a simultaneous takedown, Strike Force prosecution teams charged 91 defendants in eight cities for their alleged participation in a Medicare fraud scheme involving more than $290 million in false billings.

The Administration’s overall efforts have led to record recoveries of health care fraud, with $4.1 billion recovered in Fiscal Year 2011 alone, the highest amount to date.

 

Click here for a PDF copy of this report: http://www.cms.gov/apps/files/MedicareReport2011.pdf.


Page Last Modified: 12/02/2011 12:00 PM
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