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Title
Union activity in hospitals: past, present, and future.
First Author
Becker, Edmund R
Date of Pub
1982 Jun
Pages
1-14
Volume
3
Issue
4
Other Authors
Sloan, Frank A; Steinwald, Bruce
Abstract
Between 1970 and 1980, the percentage of hospitals with one or more collective bargaining contracts increased from 15.7 percent to 27.4 percent. A substantial amount of variation exists in the extent of unionism on the basis of hospital ownership, bed size, and location. Employees are more likely to organize when hospitals in the State are regulated by a mandatory rate-setting program. Unions raise hospital employee's wages--a modal estimate for RNs is about 6 percent; the corresponding figure for nonprofessional employees is about 10 percent. Growth of union activity in hospitals has generally not been a major contributor to hospital wage inflation, and less than 10 percent of the increase in real (relative to the Consumer Price Index) spending for hospital care that occurred during the 1970s can be attributed to union growth. We project that between 45 and 50 percent of all hospitals will have at least one union by 1990.
Abstract Continued
N/A
MeSH
Labor Unions : Collective Bargaining/trends : Comparative Study : Personnel Administration, Hospital/trends : Salaries and Fringe Benefits/trends : Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S. : United States
NTIS Number
PB82-219213